Posts Tagged ‘cooking’

Is there anybody still out there?

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This Chilli Sauce is loosely based on several from t’internet but mostly from my own head, feel free to adapt to your own tastes.

Ingredients:

A bunch of fresh chillis, mine were mostly homegrown Apache a small medium-hot pepper and a few homegrown jalapenos which are generally pretty mild. I didn’t count or weigh them but you know your own tastes, add as few or as many as you like, deseed them if you must, this sauce is going for flavour, not all out heat, although mine is verging on a 7/10 this sauce would be just as delicious using completely deseeded jalapenos and a 3/10 or all habaneros/ghost chilis to hit a 10/10.

Two thumb size pieces of ginger. Not essential but adds a roundness to the flavour profile.

Two heaped teaspoons of chopped garlic.

The juice of half a lime. I happened to have half a lime left over from last night G&T it comes through in the final flavour though.

A small/medium onion.

A good glug of good olive oil. (2-3 Tablespoons would be my guess)

A good glug of balsamic vinegar, apple cider is also a good option and not as sweet but I had balsamic in the cupboard. (see above for definition of good glug) you can add more vinegar if you like Louisiana (Tabasco) style hot sauces use treble the amount of a malt or white vinegar here instead.

A tin of chopped tomatoes. I also chucked in some cherry tomatoes that were nearing the end of their life, waste not, want not.

a pinch of dried mixed herbs, optional but again adds a roundness.

Salt and a bunch of good black peppercorns (I chucked a good teaspoon of Telicherry in the blender whole but use what you have).

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Method:

Process the chilis removing all the green stalks and add to a blender along with the onion, garlic, ginger, lime juice, seasoning and olive oil, blitz to a rough paste and fry on a low heat for 10 to 15 minutes, add the chopped tomatoes and balsamic and simmer for a further 15-20 minutes, allow to cool.

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Return to the blender (make sure it’s cold if your blender isn’t vented or you’ll be in a world of hurt) and blitz until as smooth or rough as you like it, you can even pass it through a sieve if you want it super silky.

Add to sterilised bottles and it will last up to a year in the fridge, please use your common sense here, if it looks mouldy, it is, but as long as it is left alone you should be good. Once open consume within a few weeks.

Please feel free to share this recipe with friends and family and let me know how you get on if you try it for yourselves.

cof

TTFN

Rob AKA Mr Bunny Chow

 

 

 

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Mango Chutney

Posted: 19/11/2015 in cooking videos
Tags: , ,

First off a few disclaimers and admissions.

I look like a dork in the video at least partly because I am still raising money for The Movember Foundation

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I was responsible for bringing the camera this time and I did bring two batteries but the second one appears to have failed so we swapped to another camera we had never used for video’s before and it did strange things with some of the colour so there are some black and white apples at one point for reasons beyond the comprehension of either of us.

The video is longer than we would have liked, we’re still honing our technique when it comes to filming these things and have learned what we can do next time to still show you all of the recipe without taking so damn long.

The ingredients and alternative options are listed after the video.

Ingredients:

3 large underripe mangos

3 Cooking apples (we used Granny Smiths)

2 Large Onions

Thumb sized piece of fresh Ginger, you could use stem or powdered if you wanted.

Oil, we used mustard oil, but anything you like will be fine, traditionally ghee would be used instead.

1tbs Mustard Seeds

2 Star Anise

1 Stick of Cinnamon

20 Whole Peppercorns

As many chilli flakes as you’d like, I was generous but by all means swap for smoked paprika or leave it out

300 gms caster sugar, any granulated sugar you have is fine

125ml of White wine vinegar (any tart vinegar you have)

Juice of half a lemon

2tsp Salt

A couple of handfuls of chopped dried apricots (you could use raisins, dates, prunes or any other dried fruit if you prefer)

A few dried curry leaves for colour at the end.

Thanks for watching and your feedback

TTFN

Rob and Pete

 

 

As many of you will know I’m something of an oenophile and lover of food. Although it’s a topic I have barely scraped the surface with in these pages I thought it might be fun to share some favourites with you and invite anyone out there to share one or two of their favourites either in comments or emailing me a full guest post to rantingmrbunnychow@gmail.com

This post was in part inspired by our friends Caroline and Craig over at Damn Fine Food

As I’ve named my dog and subsequently my dog in honour of the fabulous Bunny Chow I thought I’d kick things off with a simple bunny chow recipe.

The Bunny Chow despite many people’s assumptions is a style of food and there are no hard and fast rules although it generally does not actually contain bunnies, fluffy cute ones or otherwise. The recipe below is for my personal favourite type of curry mutton but feel free to substitute it with chicken, beef, venison or even if you must a vegetarian option.

Ingredients.

“The below roughly feeds a generous two but adjust to suit you”

Half a kg or so of roughly diced and preferably fatty mutton, lamb will do fine if mutton is unavailable but the cheaper the cut the better.

a couple of large onions roughly chopped

a tin of chopped tomatoes (use fresh if you prefer)

a thumb sized piece of grated ginger (the pre chopped jarred stuff is fine or even ground if in a rush I like loads)

Loads of garlic, this is down to your taste but I’d be thinking up to a full head

a couple of fresh chilli’s again down to taste with or without seeds

a teaspoon or so or turmeric

a teaspoon or three of chilli or paprika powder again down to heat preferences

a tablespoon or so of ground coriander

a teaspoon or so of garam masala (mixed spice or curry powder is fine)

a pinch of fennel seeds

a pinch of mustard seeds

a few curry leaves if you have them

any other veg you feel like but potato’s, squashes, carrots and pumpkins hold up well as do pulses and chickpeas.

optional but tasty is chopping in a couple of under ripe bananas and or some fresh coconut.  

a little flour and black pepper

A loaf of unsliced fresh crusty white bread

Method.

Bung your diced mutton, flour and black pepper in a plastic bag and do the shake shake to coat evenly.

Brown your meat in a big arse pot or Dutch oven (mine looks like this) 

then put the meat to one side and add some cooking oil or ghee to the same pot, chuck in your fennel and mustard seeds, when they begin to pop, turn the heat right down and add your onions to sweat gently.  While they are taking on a little colour grate in your ginger and pound your garlic and chillies into a paste, if they’re ready chopped then just chuck them in as is but the paste does add a little something. At this stage also add the rest of your spices whether following my earlier suggestions or using your own favourites.

Return the meat to the pot and add the chopped tomatoes and veg of choice if you’re using any, top up with stock or water to cover put the lid on and keep the heat down low and forget about it for as many hours as you can bare to or at least as long as it takes to cook the spuds and the meat to be meltingly tender. 

serve in the hollowed out centre of the bread loaf using the scooped out bread (known as the virgin) to mop up gravy.

Wine wise I’d serve this with a hearty meaty red something like a South African Cabernet Sauvignon Shiraz blend, Nederburg Baronne immediately springs to mind.

Speaking of wines we’ve recently been doing our wine shopping with www.nakedwines.com and I’d be tempted to try the above with this Shiraz from them.

Anyway I look forward to seeing some of your recipes and hearing about your favourite wines.

TTFN

Mr Bunny Chow